The
Cavan
Leitrim
Greenway

Photomontage of one of the three local C & L bridges. Courtesy of Eunan Sweeney photography

Welcome To The Cavan Leitrim Greenway

The Cavan & Leitrim (C & L ) Greenway project is a joint proposal from the five local development committees to open a quality greenway on the route of the disused narrow gauge railway between Mohill, Co Leitrim and Belturbet, Co Cavan. In addition to being a quality cycle route, it is also proposed as a recreational tourism project which meets the highest standards in safety and quality while giving access to the best of what the area has to offer.

The route is 41 kms (26 miles ) long and consists of three sections:

  • Section 1: Mohill – Fenagh – Ballinamore, 15 kms
    • Completed 2kms, Ballinamore towards Fenagh on Shannon- Erne Blueway.
  • Section 2: Ballinamore – Templeport – Ballyconnell, 16 kms
    • Completed 2.5 kms towards Corgar.
    • Completed 1.7 kms at Templeport.
    • Completed 5.5 kms, Ballyheady to Ballyconnell on Shannon- Erne Blueway
  • Section 3: Ballyconnell – Belturbet. 10 kms.

Almost the entire route remains intact and the ground is remarkably level due to a series of cuttings, embankments and bridges. It provides access to a rich variety of local landscapes including bogs, drumlins, woodland, lake and canal side views, working farms and the UN recognised Marble Arch Caves Geopark in Co Cavan. Much of the route is in the foothills of the Sliabh an Iarainn and Sliabh Rushen mountains.

The project is inspired by the significant increase in cycling and walking activity in recent years and the unsuitability of the local roads. This greenway is the result of Permitted Access Agreements with the private landowners along the old railway corridor. The landowners are impacted in different ways and the access agreements reflect their civic generosity and empathy with the local community. In keeping with the community partnership approach, this generosity shall be acknowledged in public signage on behalf of the local community.

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